Divine Recovery

On the festive occasion of Onam, here is another story for my readers.

Mani had lost his home to the local landlord after having failed to pay his loan installments that were overdue for quite some years. It was a small house he had, but the landlord had his sights on the large tract of land on which the house stood. Every year the poor farmer used to take some loan for sustenance and agriculture, but the rain and the wind gods were not always kind to him. Every year, whenever he grew fruits and vegetables on this land, the rain and winds played havoc leaving him in dire poverty year after year.

He used to pray daily at the small Krishna shrine and tell him about the difficulties he faced every day in life. How Indra and Vaayu, the gods had unseated him from his home, despite his multiple prayers day in and day out. Now this year, on the verge of Onam he had lost his house and had to seek shelter at his best friend Gopi’s house. Though Gopi was kind enough to give shelter to him and his small family, it didn’t look good that he should stay for long at his place. Moreover, Gopi also was a small time farmer who subsisted on his trees for basic survival.

The landlord had taken over his land and house, saying that Mani owed him more than the land he had usurped in lieu of the unpaid loan. He went and begged the landlord to give him one more chance this year, as he would try his best to bring up the plantations with the weather gods willing. The landlord did not budge an inch as usual and Mani retreated back to Gopi’s house dejectedly.

It was evening time and Mani as usual was found crying at Krishna’s temple talking to him at the sanctum as to what transpired between him and the landlord. The temple priest also was sitting next to Mani while he was talking. The priest was a great devotee himself and he was the mediator for devotees like Mani. He asked him to touch his shoulder and look at Krishna. To all wonder, Mani could see Krishna himself standing in all grandeur as a small boy in the sanctum. “Do not worry, dear Mani, I will take your case with the weather gods and see to it they turn favorable to you for the years to come. With regards to your land and house, we will see to it tomorrow at the Onam celebrations. Go today and rest in peace and have a sound sleep”. A weeping Mani replied, “I am deeply blessed” as he prostrated before the Lord who had disappeared shortly after giving him hope. The priest smiled at Mani and said, “Do not worry Mani, now that Krishna has taken up your case, he will see to it that the house and the land returns to you in no time. Who but He, is the lord of all lands.”

Mani was in great spirits and told Gopi all what had transpired between him and Krishna. Both families went to the temple the next morning to get the blessings on the Onam day. They took the prasadam and went to the village ground where the celebrations were to start. The start to the festivities was made by the landlord who was the chief guest by virtue of being the landlord of the village. All the villagers were indebted to him and they could not think of anyone else to invite as the guest for the proceedings.

The landlord was in a great mood, and there were a lot of games in which everybody including he participated. Mani again went to him during the ceremonies and asked if he could at least give him his house. “Yes”, he laughed “if you could beat me in three games”. The third game will be of my choosing and not any of the games that are organized in this ground today”. Mani again lost all hope and looked lost, but the temple priest came to him and asked him to contest with the landlord. “Why worry when the Lord, the master of all ceremonies is on your side”. Lots of villagers by hearsay came to know about the deal between the landlord and Mani and crowded around them to watch.

The first game was archery, both were given bows and three arrows by the event organizers. There were some fresh harvest fruits that were pasted on a board and the person who could shoot the maximum fruits down were to be adjudged the winner of the contest. The Landlord as was his wont was to start first. He was always the winner all these years in this game during the festivities and took up his bow and sent the arrows on to the fruits in a flurry as a accomplished archer would do and shot down a few fruits. Now it was Mani’s turn, who took the bow with trembling fingers. the presence of the landlord next to him itself was overwhelming. He sent the first arrow, which dislodged a fruit to the surprise of everybody. His second arrow brought down a couple of them down to the applause of everybody. The priest standing nearby asked Mani to bend the bow to the maximum before sending the third and last arrow. He did so as told, and the arrow brought down the board and the entire fruits along with it. The whole roaring crowd then moved with them to the next game venue.

There were a dozen odd plantain trees, and each participant had to cut down the bunch of bananas to the count of 10. The person who brought down the maximum bananas would be declared the winner. The landlord as usual started first and brought down around hundred bananas. It was Mani’s turn and he went about his work like he did in his plantation and came out a winner.

The landlord was in a fix. He could not let Mani win the last game as otherwise he would have to hand over the house and land, a thing which he never wanted to do. He was like Duryodhana in the Mahabharatha of yore, having usurped Yuddhishtra’s kingdom and never wanting to give even a needle point of land back. Krishna had come disguised to the celebrations and unknown to the priest, was standing next to him. He patted the priest on his back and when the priest turned, there was an old wise man who looked familiar yet could not pinpoint as to where they had met earlier. “Do not worry, it is me your favorite”, Krishna said laughingly. “The disguise is working that means, even you could not recognize me. Let me go and play my mediator role and see if the landlord relents to giving Mani his property”. “And what if he doesn’t”, asked the priest looking grave. “Do not worry, there wont be a war here. but he will lose all his wealth before the next Onam celebrations.

Having said that, Krishna walked to the landlord. The landlord was surprised to see his uncle in the midst of the celebrations. He had not seen him for a long time. The gray haired wise uncle of his talked about Mani and requested him to give him back his land but the landlord his cousin wouldn’t relent. When Krishna in his uncle’s form persisted, the landlord became angry and asked, “on whose side are you, his or mine”. “I am always by the side of my devotee”, said a smiling Krishna. The aged uncle with wrinkles couldn’t walk or see properly. Yet he had brought two fine horses as a onam gift for his cousin knowing well how he liked riding and how good he was in it. The landlord was happy to receive the gift from his uncle whom he had long forgotten. The landlord in arrogance, spoke, “if Mani can beat me to the river on horse back”, offering him one of the horses, “I would give the property back with no more conditions attached. Do you accept the challenge, Mani?” The whole crowd went silent. The landlord looked at his uncle and said, “you, of all people, wanted me to give his property, and here I am willing to do it provided he beats me in this last game.” Some villagers and children already had started running to the river end which was the finishing point for this to be contested race.

A dejected Mani looked at the priest and the landlord’s uncle. There was no hope for him now for he had never mounted a horse before, let alone having rode a horse in his entire life. The uncle intervened in the challenge. “I agree cousin to the contest but it is not fair to Mani. He has not rode a horse, looks like in his whole life. Let it be a contest among equals and you would be praised and respected among all the villagers”. “Who is the other equal in this crowd other than Mani, he asked in all directions to which his good old uncle replied “If you would permit me, I can ride a horse though I am quite old for it having lost touch for many years. I will participate on his behalf”. “Nothing doing, if he wants his house and the land back, let him ride, and not you on his behalf”, replied the landlord. “But son, you have to make some amends, you must choose someone to ride the other horse, what if Mani rides the horse and breaks his neck”. “Uncle, why are your risking your life for this petty Mani”. “That is what I am also asking on this auspicious day, why are you holding on to his property, wealthy as the Lord that your are”, asked Krishna. “See the whole crowd is waiting with baited breath as to what you will decide.” “Okay Uncle, let us both ride, you on his behalf, like old times and see who reaches the river bank first”. “There you are now, speaking like my old time good cousin”. Both got on to the horses. “Mani come, I will take you for a ride of your life”, said the old man and the crowd goaded Mani to mount the steed.

It was a tall horse, and Mani surveyed the crowd all around him as he sat behind the landlord’ uncle. He was tense and the old man asked him to hold him tightly. The priest came up to him and told him not to worry. and touched him gently on his wrist. To Mani’s surprise, the curly locks of the golden haired Krishna caressed him and was he surprised to see Krishna seated in front looking back at him with a smile. “Now do not get emotional, just hold on to me tight and from here starts the downfall of the landlord”. Waving to the crowd, the old man steadied his horse and told the priest to wave the flag for them to start the race. The crowd went into rapture and started running towards the river bank, confident that the old man had it in him to win the race and with it, their aspirations. How they wanted the old man and Mani to win and set an example to the landlord that every one’s land cannot be snatched by him without a protest.

The landlord sped off in good speed with Krishna and Mani off to a slow start. It was a good enough distance to the river bank for the horses. When the landlord had vanished into the distance, Mani’s horse picked up speed and the villagers could see now what a gifted horseman the old man was while riding his horse. They screamed in delight and ran as fast as they could to the finishing point. Within a few moments, the landlord was agitated to see his uncle overtaking him. He tried his best but could not beat his uncle to the finishing point. When he stepped down, his Uncle asked him to keep his word which he did to the delight of Mani and all the villagers who were rejoicing all around him…

Author’s note: This story came to me fleeting while listening to this devotional song

A Kadali Tale

On the occasion of Onam I wish all my dear readers a very happy, healthy and prosperous year ahead! They say after a sumptuous feast on Onam, children should listen to a story or more…

Hope you enjoy this Kadali Tale from my archives.

kadali

Reghu chanced upon a small cottage while on the run away from the nearby Chartusra city and in his travails, hungry and famished and with a bag laden with stolen valuables, the robber makes his arrival known to the inmates by coughing and gasping at their door. Vedha, the small time jeweller traded in his jewellery which was made at the cottage with Bhanu, his helping hand welcomed the tired robber not knowing his exact credentials. On inquiring as to why he looked so tired and out of breath, he said he was a trader from Chartusra and had been followed by robbers while coming this way to Patali, the port city, the same place where Vedha used to sell his home made jewellery.

Reghu was welcomed as a guest and was told, he could stay for a few days before he could gain enough strength to go to Patali. One day Reghu’s eyes fell upon the golden bunch of 4 Kadali kept in front of the Lord and worshiped by Sree, Vedha’s wife, Reghu was thinking of adding it to his collection. The old caretaker and help, Bhanu to whom Sree was just like a daughter took good care of them all. Bhanu was not happy about Reghu but Vedha dismissed his fears and allowed Reghu to stay. With stolen silver and gold coins he impressed upon the jeweller to make a replica of the Kadali saying it would fetch him a good price at Patali. The jeweller obliged and took a week before finishing one, an exact replica of the one which he had made earlier on Sree’s request.

Once the work was completed and Reghu getting impatient and tired of the stay with the lovely couple, one day kills them and flees but not before taking the work in progress jewels and the two Kadali bunch. After walking for two days and night he came across a plain land with not much human habitation near a placid river. As dusk was approaching he thought of burying the 2 golden priceless Kadali. He chose one huge old jack-fruit tree to bury one near it. As he was in the process, a fearful spirit came down the tree and asked him what he was doing. Reghu told her that he was hiding this Kadali which he had in his hand and said he would return in a week to claim it. She agreed and asked him about the other banana jewel he had in his bag. Reghu on second thought thought of burying the other one too there, but she told him to hide the second one, a hundred yards away as she could not stand the sight of the divine jewel. Do claim this one in a week otherwise you will forfeit it and I will not allow anyone who comes in possession of it, any peace, was her parting words.

Reghu walked a hundred yards and came upon a mango tree near the river bank and as instructed started burying the Lord’s Kadali there. A benevolent spirit came down the tree and asked what he was doing…. He said that he was burying the Jewel in his possession and showed it to her. So be it, she said with a smile, I will guard this till it reaches the rightful owner and help him in any test that he is put to, she murmured to herself..and went back to the tree.

The river was in full flow and had submerged most of the land when he came back after selling the stolen jewels and the coins with a few workers to set up a home. To his surprise he found the landscape had changed thanks to the flood. The marked trees had got uprooted and he knew not where his twin treasure lay buried. He was seen digging most of the time but never told his servants as to what he was looking for. They deserted him soon after his money got over. He was now a man gone mad…

Years had passed by with the jewels remaining hidden where they lay for a few generations. The land had changed much and it was a small village now. Jinu was a landless worker who got a tract of land on lease from the greedy village officer to plant banana plantains. Half of the produce he would need to give to the officer as per the deal struck between them. As expected and to Jinu’s happiness, the first crop turned out well. One day while digging a canal to water the plants in the land, he came upon one of the golden plantains. He took it to Jayaram the local jeweler who had a good look at it and gave a small token to Jinu assuring him the rest of the money, but as a law abiding citizen, he had to talk to the village officer first about its antiquity before he could sell it as the laws had changed. He showed it to the village officer the same day who kept it with himself though he told Jayaram and Jinu that he would be handing it to the higher officials in the government and had no plans to keep anything to himself. The next day he told Jinu he had other plans and asked him to stop using the land for his planned second crop.

Jinu was out of work and was finding it difficult to sustain himself after whatever money he had on him ran out. He could see that the tract of land was fully dug up by the village officer in the hope that he would get some more of such golden Kadali, but his search for more treasure turned futile. Meanwhile Jinu again approached the village officer after a couple of weeks to use the tract of land for plantation, but he was driven out.

The village officer’s wife was fascinated by the golden fruit so much that she took it daily out of the strong box to marvel at it. The fascination increased so much that the officer had to hide it in another room and lock it. Meanwhile Jinu thought of planting a few banana plantains around his small home near the river bank where he was forced to retire. At least it will keep him from hunger once his efforts bore fruit. He prayed to Krishna at his home that the first fruit from his land will be gifted to him. As he dug another canal he came upon another golden plantain which was the exact replica of the first one he had got, but this time he made good his promise and bestowed the golden marvel to Krishna. Whenever he prayed, the golden jewel would change to real bananas and he would take one as prasadam(offering from the Lord).

One day he chanced upon Tulsi standing nearby who happened to watch him at his plantation work. He inquired of her and came to know that she was jeweler Jayaram’s daughter. One day she asked if she could assist him at his work in the plantation. He replied on one condition that she should accept her fair share of the produce once it materialized to which she gladly agreed.

The officer came to know that Jinu had a small plantation around his house. Somehow be didn’t like it but also couldn’t do much about it. Jayaram paid a visit to Jinu and saw the bunch of 4 bananas with a golden hue kept near Krishna’s idol. Oh! how marvelous a sight and so golden, said he after tasting the one from the bunch offered to him by Jinu. Can I have one more..Why not sir…take two, one for Tulsi too, smiling at her, who was standing at the door. The much pleased Jayaram had never had such a tasty fruit and he expressed the same while having it. Sir, my Krishna’s prasadam is always like his love. The more you love Him, more sweet will be your offering to Him and so, his prasadam in return. Being a devotee himself, Jayaram was no doubt thrilled by Jinu’s company. He and his daughter became frequent visitors. One day Jinu revealed to Jayaram, his wish to marry Tulsi. But Jayaram first decided to put Jinu to the test before he could approve his request.

Krishna

Jayaram asked Jinu. This bunch of mini kadali that you offer to Krishna daily…can you show me the plantain which yields such sweet bananas to you. Jayaram was sure no plantain could yield a bunch daily, in fact not more than one in its lifetime and with Jinu having not more than a dozen odd plantains, there seemed to be a mystery about them which he wanted to unravel.

Jinu was in a fix as to what he should say when an old woman came that way and asked for some ripe banana as food to be given. Jinu said I can give you some rice and vegetable but I doubt I can give you a banana at this time as it was well last noon and his kadali prasadam could yield real banana only before noon based on his experience.

The old woman laughed a bit loudly, much to Jinu’s and Jayaram’s consternation. You call yourself a planter? There, yonder. I can see a bunch of fine kadali. Jinu rushed to his garden and much to his surprise there was one ripe kadali bunch awaiting them. He took it down and gave to the woman. No, I don’t want all of this, maybe you can give the better share of this to your guest here, smilingly pointing at Jayaram. Saying so, the woman took leave.

Jayaram was a bit disturbed and left with a perplexed mind. The next day he sent Tulsi to bring a bunch of fresh Kadali. Tulsi came in the morning as was her wont, to Jinu’s house, prayed to Krishna, took two of the prasadam kadali and there were only two left for the day. Father has sent me for a bunch if you could provide it. Jinu at a loss went to the same tree and there, lo another bunch of ripe bananas was waiting to be taken down.

This went on for a few days. Jayaram came on the fourth day himself and examined the tree. There was none. He was going to win he thought when another woman appeared asking for something to eat. Jinu asked what he could give her. Don’t bother I will go inside and take what I need. She went inside and was not to be seen for sometime. Both went in to see her feasting on a bunch of freshly plucked kadali. Jayaram was at a loss of words and failed to understand what was going on. He asked Jinu from where this bunch came when Tulsi appeared in the doorway saying I plucked it in the morning before you two had even got up and kept it here.

The woman had her fill and after blessing Jinu and Tulsi and laughing at Jayaram went her way. It was a matter of a few weeks time before Tulsi and Jinu got married on an auspicious day.

The village officer couldn’t sleep on many a night as he could hear someone pounding on the closed door. The noise from the room where he kept the golden Kadali, the disturbance from the roof as if someone heavy was trampling upon the tiles…the fearful shadow behind the curtains, the poor sight of his wife already at her wits end when she could not see the golden fruit anymore, now out of sight behind the closed door of the cursed room. It was just a matter of time before the officer too went mad after he saw the room ransacked, one day, by some robber and the golden Kadali missing…

Indian Monsoon

Wandering miles through burnt grass
in search of the elusive water source
the animals all huddled up, look for signs
that can only herald the arrival of
their perennial savior from the skies.

One fine day, a cool breeze starts to blow.
The hot air now becomes the hunted
looking for dear places to hide
for death is certain with the arrival
of the Great Indian Monsoon.

The small streams and the rivulets,
pour their volumes into rivers beds
that were once sand banks and ponds
and playing fields to kids in summer
now slushy fields with the downpour.

Life is back to normal now that nature
has bestowed its blessings upon the
region that gets its bountiful rain
for which man was ready till now
to barter with gold and riches he had.

So much is at stake, thus spake the
economists whose misty vision
revolves and evolves on the
aspects as well as the prospects
of an advancing and retreating monsoon..

Examining our cultural journey

I have reblogged this post from Vidya’s site.

When we were children, India was still an agriculture-based nation. Coming home to Kerala during our vacations meant coming home to the fields. Of course, the young people had all found their way out of agriculture, but the fields of paddy that had been created painstakingly by our dedicated ancestors who had mastered the art […]

Examining our cultural journey

The gardener

It is a hot summer day and the plants are waiting for you to water them. Duty-bound as you are, you have already got up, and are pulling the lines of rubber pipes that would carry life giving water to each of those trees and shrubs that you had lovingly planted.

The strip of land that you had bought long back brings back memories of your youth. You had never known then that at one point of time you would come back to this very strip and grow plants in abundance, so much so, that the sun would need to take an appointment if he wanted to grace you with his sunshine. You wander among the bushes to do the final round of checks to see that these pipes have not got entangled and are laid properly and would not damage the fledgling bushes that you had taken so much care to bring up in the last few weeks.

All looks proper as you survey the long network of pipes neatly laid out that would now start transporting the water as it gushed through them. You take the shovel in your hand to make the finishing touches for plants around their roots so that they could have more water as it would come in turns towards them.

The wind is gently blowing carrying it with shades of warm and cool air, as it sifts through the dense network of branches and leaves. There are some sparrows on the ground chit chatting and waiting for you to turn on the motor so they could enjoy frolicking in the water that would present itself at any moment from now before them.

A squirrel jumps just in time, as you make your way toward the shed that lodges the motor pump that would draw the water from the pond. In the olden days, you had to be alert as there were no pipes and then canals made out of the sand would do their job in assisting you with the gardening process. You had to be on the look out lest any of those sand canals would give away before your very eyes.

You switch on the motor, amble across to the bushes till someone who watches you loses sight of you. You take the end of the rubber hose and start watering the plants, the roots, the branches and the leaves and sometimes playfully at the sparrows who all love you for what you are…images

A lake and the Sea

The far end of Vembanad LakeCruising pictures from the LakeCouple of hours in the morning boatIt was cold when we started at 8 amThe boat makes its way out into the lakeThe Sun setting at Marari beach, Mararikulam, close to AlleppeyThe day winding up at this sideThe surf making beachTalking while wetting your feetIs the sea or the beach largerThe SunSandSeaMan’s imprints are temporary. Nature’s is permanentThe might of the silent sea. If only we can learn from it.The metallic colors of the shining Sea.It was a 2 day trip from our travel base at Kumarakom.

The coconut tree

coco1
Pic Courtesy : Beabeeinc.com

I grow straight up as years go by
from where I can see you below
while trying to eke out a living
going nuts with pressures in life.

The bark, the fronds, the husk
the nut flesh, the water and oil
do know I got everything to offer
as food or fuel to run your life.

Taste the milk from the nuts
enjoy the pure coconut water
you can eat the sweet ripe flesh
all you need to help preserve yours.

While stranded on a beach
waiting for help to arrive soon
pray to get an instance of me nearby
have the sense to break open the fruit.

To feed your thoughts and good self
do plant my seedlings and see me grow
you won’t be disappointed ever in life
for the Lord did make our lifespans equal.

coco3.jpg

The Boy of Tidings

It is still dark in the city as the sun was yet to wake up at the horizon from his deep slumber late last evening. It seemed he was tired of peeking through the clouds brought about by a cyclone that had ravaged many a southern state and was still streaking to conquer uncharted territories on the Indian west coast trying to make a landfall before it died down. The Ockhi cyclone had made a surprise appearance at the southern tip of India and  churned the Indian ocean and the Arabian sea much to the horror of coastal towns and villages and had played with the lives of the fisherman community who had travelled the high seas during the last few days. Though it ran shy of the indian coast so far, the wind  the churning waves and the rain had in its grip the towns of Kanyakumari, Nagercoil, the Kerala coast and had ravaged Lakshadweep islands, the damage of which is still to be known.

ockhi
Pic Courtesy: The Hindu

The newspaper boy had already started his work near one of the many bus stops in the city, trying to sort out the many news papers and magazines that he need to carry across to homes to those news hungry and elderly people who would wait for him for happy tidings as he would swirl the newspaper at them from a safe distance. He still had a good aim to reach somewhere near their outstretched hands, as if it was a offering from the gods at dawn.

But today, the winds and the slight rain had made his job difficult. Navigating his cycle through the pools of water on the streets from the overnight rains, he had to go and find out a dry stretch on the steps of each house where he could safely deliver the paper full of news that should not be drenched while his eager readers this day decided to stay within the safe confines of their home instead of looking out to welcome him.

newspaperboy.jpg

Running late, he saw the morning sun after so many days in his distribution work. The  sun with a mighty effort had finally gathered himself and had started his journey across the still cloudy skies. As he looked down, the only movement he could detect was a tiny boy braving the cold windy weather going to each home with a sheaf of papers…

Ramayana

rama

1. Born to Dashratha, King of Ayodhya
Rama, the eldest among four sons
cheerful, loved by all, and yet so humble
a great son to a great father was he.

2. Rama of Kausalya and Bharata of Kaikeyi
Lakshmana and Shatrughana of Sumitra
four pillars of strength to the King Dashratha
Ayodhya glowed with due resplendence.

3. In those days the earth was abound with
the rakshashas, the so called demons
who created fear wherever they roamed
in holy saints and mighty human kings.

4. Their king, Ravana who ruled Lanka
with great warriors in his army
he had subdued even the devas
on account of boons got from Brahma.

5. With his son Indrajith, a warrior
master of black magic and many astras
with his maya powers was unconquerable
even Indra got defeated by him.

6. Ravana had asked immunity from gods
the gandharvas and the yakshas
as boons from Brahma during his tapas
but not from man whom he thought puny.

7. Rama, of the solar dynasty, the race
had mighty kings Ikshavaku and Sagara
with Anshuman and Bhageeratha
the oceans and the Ganges we had.

8. One day, of Dashratha, was requested
services of Rama by the sage Vishwamitra
who himself was a great King, now a sage
master of every weapon, a Brahmarishi.

9. It was a thirst to rival Vasishta, the sage
that Vishwamitra became a Brahmarishi
the progress towards it contains a story
that fills pages with unraveled glory.

10. With Vishwamitra conducting a yagaa
let Rama be on guard for destroying
the rakshasas who defile the yaaga
as they shower unclean items on it.

11. Vishwamitra could destroy them
being a dignified sage, he less wished
merits to be wasted on curse or injury
though being master of every astra.

12. Dashratha not willing to let go of Rama
but with an unflinching Vishwamitra,
whose anger the world had known
was advised by preceptor Vasishta to let go.

13. The sage with Rama and Lakshmana
the princes by his side, as they walked
resembled a force, no evil could face
safeguard the ritual was the holy goal.

14. On the way, the sage, a great teacher
initiated the two princes with the astras
the use of weapons and how to recall
memorize and equip them for future.

15. After six days and nights, upon arrival
Maareecha was thrown to a long distance
and Subaahu killed on the spot with others
fruitful end of the yaaga and the rakshasas.

16. On the way back, the sage, all knowing
took the princes through the city of Mithila
ruled by the great King Janaka, a beloved
daughter Sita, a kind and beautiful soul.

17. The city of Mithila, ruled by Janaka
where Sita would wed a prince
who would lift and string the bow of Siva
a lot of suitors had come for her and failed.

18. Janaka was happy to see the Sage illustrious
with the two charming princes who glowed
by blessings of the sage and by royal birth
Happy he was, who wished Rama be a suitor.

19. On that auspicious day, hinted by Janaka
Rama was to be shown the great bow
when Rama, lifted, strung and then bent it
joy broke out among all those, Sita included.

20. Sita garlanded Rama, her Lord for great years
messengers in haste to Ayodhya, with glad news
royal court so happy, with mothers waiting for
Rama who defeated the asuras and wed Sita.

21. When Dashratha decided to crown Rama
Kaikeyi coaxed him to change on bestowed vows
Rama be sent to the forest for 14 long years
let her son Bharata be anointed the crown.

22. When the news broke out, Rama was silent
it was important he followed his father wishes
with Sita and Lakshmana, both unrelenting
to stay back, while he roamed the forests alone.

23. That night when Rama left, the great King
Dashratha passed away and gloom descended
Bharatha not in town not aware of happenings
when called for, he did best what he had in mind.

24. He and his retinue went on the look out
found Rama in the forest and pressed him
to return to his rightful place and crown
Rama remained firm, to honor his vow
to a great father who was now lost to him.

25. Bharata was to return and rule
the brother his mission failed assumed
the role of a caretaker by installing Rama
in his heart and his sandals on the crown.

26. The stay in Chitrakoota at first
then the dandaka forest, was spent well
initially in the company of sages
who welcomed them with all hearts.

27. The time of thirteen years had passed
the events had to change for the purpose
of Rama’s birth, the fall of Ravana
was initiated by the latter’s sister.

28. Soorpanakha, on seeing Rama
desired him to have as her husband
but Rama dodged her to Lakshmana
and the latter again sent her to Rama.

29. When she knew they were playing
becoming angry and rushed upon Sita
mutilated, she ran to her brothers
Khaara and Dooshana, stationed nearby.

30. Having related to them the happenings
her brothers came with great numbers
Raama single handedly dealt with them
the death blow, causing great rage in Lanka.

31. Akampana a survivor reached Lanka
Ravana beset with rage not knowing
how dare a man cause such great havoc
the best way to punish him, he consulted.

32. Hearing Sita’s beauty from Soorpanakha
he decided to covet her, and kill Rama
but was advised by Mareecha not to proceed
but prevailed upon, they set together on a plan.

33. With a wily disguise, Mareecha as a deer
a golden beauty, the sight bewitching to Sita
imploring Rama to get it for her as a pet
Rama went after the deer for a distance.

34. Rama knowing the demon in deer shot him
when Mareecha regained his form he cried
his last act in the staged play, before he died
Mareecha cried out exactly in Rama’s voice.

35. As Rama’s voice in distress reached
confused Sita asked Lakshmana to go
who stood his ground, as per his duty
an angry Sita drove him away weeping.

36. When Lakshmana out of the scene,
Ravana stepped in a mendicant’s form
with respect, he introduced his greatness
when Sita angrily rebuked, he took her away.

37. When Rama saw Lakshmana, he feared greatly
they being tricked, hastily hurrying back
not seeing her at the hut, where could she be
was she playing a prank or did someone take her?

38. When Ravana sped fast in his puskpaka
he fought the opposing Jataayu, the aging eagle
Sita removed some of her jewels hastily
dropping them, to a group of monkeys below.

39. The brothers came upon poor Jataayu
in his last moments, who told what happened
before dying a brother who tried his best
failure, it does come even to the invincible.

40. On the way they came upon a Rakshasa
he was released from the curse, when killed
the divine being told them to seek Sugreeva
who would help them in their quest for Sita.

41. Vaali and Sugreeva, brothers of great power
once when an asura challenged Vaali to a duel
they fought for many days in a mountain cave
fearing Vaali had perished, Sugreeva blocked it

42. Sugreeva came back to be crowned king
when Vaali weary with fight came back
he drove Sugreeva out while keeping his wife
wasn’t Vaali resembling the like of Ravana?

43. Hanuman who was Sugreeva’s minister
a great communicator, he was his strength
when Rama and Lakshmana came looking
Hanuman was sent to know, if friend or foe.

44. It was Sugreeva to whom Sita had dropped
the jewels when she saw the group of five
the only way was to restore to Sugreeva
his kingdom Kishkindha of wise monkeys.

45. It was difficult to kill Vaali face to face
with Indra’s necklace he could not be won
when Sugreeva and Vaali in a close duel
arrow from Rama killed Vaali from behind.

46. With Sugreeva back as Vanara chief
he decided to sent his people as scouts
in all directions, scores were sent out
the best headed south where Ravana flew.

47. With Hanuman and Angada
the crown prince and Vaali’s son
with Jambavaan the king of bears
why wouldn’t the south group succeed?

48. Rama had full faith in Hanuman
gave his ring and a certain incident
so that Hanuman could be trusted
if he should be able to speak to Sita.

49. The search party arrived at the shore
the sea seemed a hurdle as it lay across
they saw Sampati, the aged eagle brother
told him about Jataayu and he about Lanka.

50. Lanka was at a distance of 100 yoganas
the vanaaras in the group when asked
some could jump 10, or even 50 not more
Angada could do one way but not two.

51. When Jaambavan reminded Hanuman
about his hidden prowess, the son of Vaayu
grew in stature and made a huge form
before making that leap of faith to far Lanka.

52. On the way he met a few friends and foes
but humble as he was, with great faith
he could well explain or swiftly destroy
as there was no time to talk or rest.

53. Landing as a small ape, he was startled
by the guardian goddess who slapped him
she was stunned when he slapped back
the fall of the city started as she vanished.

54. Hanuman went in search of mother Sita
he searched every palace, adorned by riches
where great men and women rested in peace
but not Sita in these places without any peace.

55. He came upon a calm, pleasant garden
was it Sita sitting, surrounded by women
guarding her fearfully, when he saw Ravana
walking to her and telling her to yield to him.

56. Hanuman in his tiny form, hidden in the tree
below where Sita sat, sang the praise of Rama
in a language, even great scholars could not
Sita having seen him, was still not convinced.

57. Hanuman then showed her Rama’s ring
and the incidents only known to them
consoled was she, now that she knew
her Lord would come to rescue her.

58. Hanuman decided to strike some terror
they should know about Rama, his army
he laid waste the garden which caused
the news about him, reported to Ravana.

59. Thinking it was some wicked monkey
he sent a few soldiers who were slain soon
then he sent a fierce warrior, Jambumali
who too was slain, causing discomfort.

60. Ravana then dispatched his son Aksha
a disciplined and formidable warrior
but he too was sent to the heavens
causing the great Indrajit to step in.

61. When all weapons of great strength
failed to effect Hanuman, the great son
of Ravana sent the Brahmastra
and bound by it, Hanuman lay motionless.

62. The rakshasas surrounded Hanuman
bound him by ropes and presented him
before the ten headed seated Ravana
the monkey will be shown his stature.

63. The brahmastra could not effect Hanuman
because of an earlier boon from Brahma himself
the tying of ropes on a person already bound
would diminish the effects of that great astra.

64. First counsel to Ravana was to kill the vanara
but Vibhishana, his brother a kindhearted soul
prevailed to spare the life of naughty Hanuman
as per dharma, was it proper to kill a messenger?

65. Second counsel was to put fire to his tail
loads of cloth were brought and soaked in oil
bound to the tail which seemed to increase
the length but they lit it up not knowing him.

66. Before the happy rakshasas would know
the great servant of Rama shook his bonds
flew up into the sky and set fire to the palaces
all places he could think of to scare them.

67. He rushed to Sita, was she affected?
so glad to see her safe and sound
apprising her of what happened, assuring her
the army of Rama will appear soon to free her.

68. Hanuman, his mission accomplished
with acknowledgements from Sita received
he flew across the sea and patted the mountain
which rose to offer him rest, he while on a hurry.

69. Having landed in front of his friends
who were getting worried on his delay
he told them of of his visit in Lanka
joyfully they resumed back to Rama.

70. Rama mighty pleased to see Hanuman
to hear of his valorous deeds of crossing
and having seen his beloved wife Sita
sad of her plight told in far off Lanka.

71. Sugreeva gave orders to call all divisions
monkeys and bears came from all corners
the army of Sugreeva was a sight to behold
they marched southwards to the great sea.

72. The sea, a challenge to be tided over
for the mighty warriors to cross over
for not all could jump as Hanuman did
the need of the hour was a quick bridge.

73. Back in Lanka, Ravana held a call
on the damage done by Rama’s ape
how best we could destroy this army
Vibheeshana had a good solution.

74. Return Sita to Rama and fall
at his feet, don’t you know who he is?
this was not acceptable to Ravana
and he drove Vibeeshana out of Lanka.

75. The good souled cast off brother
surrendered to Rama, knowing him
though others were wary of acceptance
Rama crowned him as a future King.

76. Rama prayed to the sea god
to help him tide over the problem
the sea god appeared and said
he could only help maintain a bridge.

77. Why worry when you among have
Nala, son of the great Vishwakarma,
advised the sea god to Rama
he will be your architect to you
just as his father was to the gods.

78. The call was to bring stones and trees
great columns of these dropped
the sea held still on to these rocks
the army of soldiers built it fast.

79. The big army marched on the bridge
it was a matter of time before they reached
the shores of Lanka, a city waiting to fall
days before the war cry would sound.

80. Before the war was set to begin
Rama decided to give Ravana a last chance
he sent Angada the prince as a messenger
again the great lord of Lanka did not listen.

81. The war had begun with both armies
formidable, one with rocks and trees
the other with shields, arrows and clubs
blood flowed in torrents, a sight to behold.

82. Ravana sent Indrajith when he found
the balance uneven, who fired naga darts
that felled Rama and Lakshmana
to the bewilderment of the vanara army.

83. Soon Garuda the eagle king flew to the scene
seeing their sworn enemy, snake darts vanished
stroking the brothers now revived by his feathers
the great bird disappeared into the distance

84. With the war going at full swing
a lot of warriors falling on Ravana’s side
he ordered to wake up Kumbakarna
from his sleep, for he alone was enough.

85. With his deep sleep disturbed
the great giant brother of Ravana
enquired as to what had happened
knowing that Rama had arrived.

86. Not approving of Ravana’s act
of having brought Sita to Lanka
he had gone off to sleep as his curse
for six months just before the war.

87. His sleep disturbed, Kumbakarna
duty bound now strode into battle
causing great havoc among the vanaras
Rama killed him before he could kill more.

88. Indrajith again dispatched this time
fired the Brahmaastra on the brothers
the great weapon, though did strike them
they fell in a swoon, but appeared dead.

89. The might vanara camp became gloomy
to the glee of the losing Rakshasa army
Ravana in great joy ordered Sita to be shown
the plight of her lord grounded from the air.

90. Jambavaan sent for Hanuman
to fetch the sanjeevani herb from north
that alone could rid the effects of the astra
restoring the princes to their original glory.

91. Hanuman took upon the task
no task appeared huge for him
only one thing mattered, his master
should come back to win this war.

92. He took some time to identify the herbs
failing, he picked up the whole hillock
with his hugh frame, flying back to Lanka
with the sanjeevani given, all was well.

93. With fresh hopes, the vanara army attacked
the gates of Lanka, and this time Indrajith
again had to come out as even Prahastha
Ravana’s commander in chief had perished.

94. Lakshmana riding on Hanuman shoulders
struck a duel with Indrajith, astra to astra
finally delivering the Indrastra on Indrajith
which struck him dead and Ravana in sorrow.

95. For Ravana, all these warriors now dead
who had acquired boons and master of weapons
who had defeated the gods was wonderstruck
as to whether Rama was Narayana himself.

96. With no one in the camp left, as a general
it was Ravana himself who marched out to battle
Vibeeshana pointing out to Rama where he was
Rama thought, a great warrior but had to be slain.

97. A great battle ensued between the ten headed
and the vanara warriors, and chiefs combined
but Ravana the matchless warrior that he was
duly dispatched them back with sore injuries.

98. The two Lords, warriors faced each other
one had acquired boons and absorbed sins
the other having the blessings of the blessed
the gods came out to see the great duel that day.

99. Darts flew from both Rama and Ravana
each astra was met by a matching astra
finally Ravana’s chariot was shattered
while he looked defeated, Rama sent him back.

100. The next day, with many ill omens
Ravana came out to face Rama once again
the battle took place for a long time
when Indra sent his chariot for Rama.

101. Standing in the godly chariot
Rama shone like the sun of the solar dynasty
his prowess unequalled sending shafts
that each time defied the ones Ravana sent.

102. Finally the time has come, may I
remind you, said the charioteer to Rama
of the Brahmastra that should be fired
when Rama with a sigh, applied the mantra.

103. The great astra flew and struck Ravana
and what a great fall that was
the invincible and unconquerable once
now fell lifeless to the ground heavily.

104. There was great jubilation
every person in the Ravana camp
was spared and treated very well
on orders from Rama and Vibeeshana.

105. Finally Sita was free and back with Rama
with Vibeeshana now made king of Lanka,
Rama along with his devoted wife and brother
flew to Ayodhya in the pushpaka vimana.

106. It is said that Sugreeva and Vibheeshana
with Hanuman accompanied the raghu princes
on the way to Ayodhya, with other vanaras
who played important roles in the war.

107. The vimana landed at an Ashrama
of Bharadwaja the sage for the night
before Hanuman could inform Bharata
who ruled Ayodhya from his ashrama.

108. Bharata mighty pleased meets Rama
on whose behalf he had ruled 14 long years
and returns the kingdom to the rightful king
thus ends the Ramayana signifying victory over evil.